Collier Boat Ramp and Jetty Removal

 

Project is completed! See this 90-second video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BiC1zjruLxY

Final Project Report

 

August 2015 update - Project leads are waiting for an opening in the fish window, which will occur in September. All permits are in hand, and a contract was signed with a construction firm. Construction set to begin in September 2015.

January 2015 progress report

Construction is anticipated during the summer of 2015 to avoid sand lance and herring spawning in the area. Permits have been secured:


 

Squaxin Island Tribe propose to remove the final two sediment barriers blocking lateral net shore-drift along 5.7 miles of Pickering Passage in South Puget Sound. The project will remove a private boat ramp and decommission a large boat basin by removing concrete wall extensions that trap sediment. The project site is rated as high priority for restoration by the Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project. The site is rated by WDFW as having potential for forage fish spawning. Sand lance have been documented spawning at the site as well as down drift (sediment) over multiple years of sampling. The drift cell ends ¼ of a mile down-drift from the project area at the Squaxin Pass herring spawning site located at the mouth of Hammersley Inlet. This herring run is documented as one of only two stocks in Puget Sound found to be genetically distinct and is used as an indicator for Puget Sound herring by the Puget Sound Partnership which has set a goal of increasing production to 880 tons by 2020. It is hypothesized that removing the impediments to net shore-drift will result in increased spawning habitat for sandlance, surfsmelt and herring all of which are important food sources for Puget Sound salmonid species.

 

Long-term success will be represented by increased numbers of salmon due to additional habitat for herring and sand lance forage fish. In the mid-term, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife conducts yearly acoustic trawls of the Squaxin Pass herring stock adjacent to the site to calculate biomass. It is hypothesized that restoring a natural sediment regime, specifically by allowing the nearshore drift of sediment during all conditions, will increase and improve the physical area available for spawning. Short-term success will be evaluated by monitoring beach sediment loads at the site as well as up-drift and down-drift. This will be accomplished measuring tidal height elevations at permanent cross section sites.

Pre-project demolition photos:

Boat Basin

Boat Basin

Boat ramp

Demolition underway! - 

A short video of the demolition

collier demolition

 

Collier demolition

 

Collier demolition

 

Collier demolition

 

demolition

 

demolition

 

demolition

 

demolition

 

demolition

 

Drone day 2

 

Drone day 2 shot 2

 

Day 3 shot 2

 

Day 3 shot 3

 

Day 3 shot 4

 

boat ramp removal

 

boat ramp removal


Contact: 

 

Scott Steltzner , (360) 432-3803, ssteltzner@squaxin.nsn.us